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Have a question? Send it in! Questions are answered by Rabbi Bartfeld.

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# 1280 Come Again?
Q. A rav desires to conduct kabbalos Shabbos/ Maariv services in two different communities (one early Shabbos and then at the regular time). At the first services, he will not be davening himself (someone else will daven for the amud), but rather the rav's purpose in going there is to give a drasha and to instruct people in hilchos Shabbos, etc. May he attend the first services, answer Barechu (without actually davening Maariv), and then drive to the second place (obviously, before shkia)?
Is it a Chillul Hashem, as all the people there were already mekabel Shabbos and they see the rav getting in his car in front of them? Even if he explains that he is having in mind not to accept Shabbos, it is perhaps an odd thing to do?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that since the Rav was not mekabel Shabbos yet he is allowed to travel before the time of candle lighting. Also he does not depend on this early minyan, as he is davening at the late minyan. Therefore the early kabolas Shabbos of that tzibur does not affect him.
There is also no issue of ma’aras ayin if the Rav explained publicly or is already known that he will be davening at the later minyan.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/17/2017 2:42 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1279 Clothes Make The HaMan or Blessings In Disguise?
Q. It says in Mishna Berura that you have to wear Shabbos clothing on Purim, But it also says that you should wear an attire (partzufin) Which is more correct?

A. Different reasons have been mentioned for the minhag of donning disguises in Purim, such as giving the opportunity to the poor to collect tzedaka without being embarrassed (Minhagei Kol Aryeh)
The miracle of Purim was disguised in ordinary occurrences and events, such as Vashti being executed and Esther taking her place. The Talmud (Megila 12a) writes that just as the Jews at the time pretended only to be serving other gods, Hashem also pretended that He was going to destroy the Jewish nation, and in the end it was only a semblance (Bnai Isoschor). It would seem that we are being encouraged to wear them. However, Rema (Shulchan Aruch O.H. 696: 8) and Mahari Mintz (17) mention only that it is permitted, but do not encourage it necessarily.
While in regards to wearing Shabbos clothing on Purim, Mishna Berura (695: 3) writes in the name of the (Poskim) Achronim that it is proper to wear them at the night megila reading also.
The minhag of the Maharil, Avodas Yisroel, Ben Ish Chai (Tetzave) and others was similar (See Yemei Hapurim 5: 1).
Eliahu Rabba (691: 15) mentions that one should change to clothing of import as a remembrance to; “Mordechai left the king's presence with royal raiment, (Esther 8: 15).”
Horav Yaakov Hirschman Shlit’a suggested that one could dress up with Shabbos Chasidishe clothing, since for one who does not usually wear them, they would constitute a disguise.
Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that wearing Shabbos clothing supersedes the minhag some have of wearing a costume, at least most of the time.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 3/17/2017 12:08 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1278 With All Due Respect
Q. Can you repeat or think Purim Torah while in a bathroom?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that since you are repeating or thinking of verses and words of our sages, albeit in a nonsensical and ludicrous content, it would be still prohibited while being in an improper location.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/14/2017 12:11 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1277 Kidding Aside
Q. When you say over Purim Torah, do you comply with the mitzva of learning Torah?

A. Many sayings of our sages may be seen as what would qualify as Purim Torah, e.g. “Where is Hamman written in the Torah? It is said: Hamin Haetz” (Chulin 139b). Apotekee,a greek term meaning a lien on land, that was translated to stand for the Aramaic ‘Apo Tehe Koee” (you should collect from this) which is obviously a fanciful untrue translation, and many others. Still they are all part of the Talmud and Midrashim.
Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that of course it depends of what is being said. However even if it is totally nonsensical, absurd and not even amusing, you may still be rewarded for the psukim and correct quotes of our sages included. Nevertheless, the above applies to sayings and expressions that do not ridicule or make a mockery of the Torah and mitzvos or other people, which constitutes a very grave sin.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/14/2017 12:10 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1276 This Is Not Purim Torah
Q. What is the reason for the strange minhag of saying Purim Torah?

A. Osri Lagefen (p. 183) explains that Purim Torah is a result from the mitzva of “Lebesumei BePuriya” (Shulchan Aruch O.H. 695: 2). And it proves a most important point. Namely, that even when Bnei Yisroel are in a state of inebriation, what they speak is divrei Torah, as opposed to other cultures, Albeit this divrei Torah may be not entirely reliable. He also mentions that some of this Purim Torah could have a strong moral value, when said properly, since words of necessary admonishment that one may not usually say, become then acceptable. Ohel Moshe (p. 210) describes how Purim was kept in the Mirer Yeshiva mentioning that in the presence of Rav Yerucham zt”l, talmidim would recite Purim Torah. Similar accounts are legend from many other yeshivos.
A curious source is quoted in Nitei Gavriel (Purim 30: p. 587). Since on Purim poor people would put on disguises and go around collecting matonos laevyonim, Goyim would see an opportunity to cheat and do the same. As a security check, one collecting would be asked to recite something of Torah, that even a child would know, and it indeed sounded like Purim Torah.
Others mention that the Torah was accepted a second time on Purim. However, this time it was done with willingness and love, reflected on the fun and joy spirit of Purim Torah.
Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a added that the “Ad delo yoda” mentioned as the measurement of inebriation in Purim, is indeed the demonstration of what one really knows.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a.



Posted 3/10/2017 3:37 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1275 Give it Time
Q. Can I give money to a family that needs it before Purim, and it should be counted as Matanot Laevyonim since they need it for Purim expenses, usually bought before Purim?

A. Shulchan Aruch (O.H. 695: 4) mentions Matonos Laevyonim as a mitzva that pertains to Purim and should be complied with on that day. Therefore Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that for the money to be included in this particular mitzva it should be given on Purim itself. If given before, it should be with the condition that it be held as a pikadon or deposit in trust by the receiver, to be obtained (koine) and used on Purim itself. If it is a post-dated cheque, it should be given also on the same terms, as the post-dated cheque could be exchanged now.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/10/2017 3:34 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1274 Give Me a Break
Q. How much is this year the minimum amount for Matanot Laevyonim and for the (half coin) Machatzit Hashekel?

A. On question 507 on this forum we wrote: “Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit’a advises to give at least a dollar for matonos loevyonim, (a Zichron Binyomin dollar is also good). The reason is that you can acquire a roll of bread and something in it, to be used for a minimum seudah.” That still stands today.

As far as machatzis hashekel we wrote, “if possible you can give seven (Canadian) dollars, the approximate value of the silver in that half a shekel coin today.” (March 2014, the price of a silver Troy ounce was then $19.7 usd. - on March 7, 2017 the price is $17.6 usd.)

On question 1024 in this forum we wrote: “Rema (O.H. 694: 1) rules that we donate besides Matonos Laevyonim, also Machatzis Hashekel, but the amounts differ. Mishna Berura (694: 2) asserts to follow the opinion of the Ritvo (Megila 7b) that one fulfils the matonos laevyonim obligation even with two prutos (one prutah per indigent) or its equivalent in food. (“shaveh Prutah”) The value of a perutah according to the opinion of the Chazon Ish is 1/40 or .025 of a gram of silver, and according to the Masoro it is .0182 of a gram of silver (Masores Hashekel p.119) At today's (Adar 5776) price of silver (about $0.50 U.S.D. per gram) it would result in $0.0125 or $0.0091, a bit more or less than a penny. Although one fulfills one’s obligation with a prutah, nonetheless, Poskim write that it’s proper to give each poor person a significant and meaningful gift (Maharsho – Megila ibid.) Others maintain that it should be enough to purchase three egg volumes of bread (Sha'arey Teshuvo 694, see also other opinions on Nitey Gavriel – Purim 33:2) Yeme Mishteh VeSimcha (p. 244 – published in 5766) quotes Rav Elyashiv zt'l as saying that even though one fulfills one’s obligation with a prutah, nonetheless, it’s proper to give each poor person about 5 shekalim which is an amount which would make the poor person happy. Halichot Shlomo (chap 19, note 62) quotes Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt”l as having said that in order to fulfill all opinions one should give an amount which is significant by the giver and by the taker’s standards. In question 507 in this forum we wrote that Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit'a advises to give at least a dollar (Canadian) for matonos loevyonim, (a Zichron Binyomin paper equivalent dollar is also good). The reason is that you can still acquire a roll of bread with something in it, to be used for a minimum seudah. The Rov maintains that on this year, although the Canadian dollar has decreased in value, the above still stands.”

A machatzis hashekel is the value of 9.6 grams of silver lechumra and 7.5 grams in leniency. The price of silver was yesterday (March 8, 17), approximately $0.76 Canadian per gram. So the value of machatzis hashekel is between $7.30 to $5.70.

Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that you can use the lower figure.


Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a

 


Posted 3/10/2017 1:22 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1273 Bright Is Early
Q. When should machatzis hashekel be given this year, on Taanis Esther (Thursday) or Motzei Shabbos (Purim)?

A. There are different opinions and traditions as to when to give machatzis hashekel. Rema (694: 1) maintains that the minhag is to give machtzis hashekel before Mincha on Ta’anis Esther. Mishna Berura (ibid.:4) affirms this minhag. Piskei Teshuvos (694: 3) quotes Luach Eretz Yisroel to give it after Mincha. He and Kaf HaChaim 694:25 maintain that it should be given on Ta’anis Esther even if the ta’anis is advanced to the previous Thursday. This is done in order to donate tzedaka on the fast day.
As the Talmud teaches (Brachos 6b) that the reward for a fasting day is the charity given.
However, Chazon Ovadyah (Purim pg 101) and Piskei Teshuvos (ibid.) opine that the minhag is to give it before the reading of the Megilla, the reason is founded on the Talmud (Megillah 13b) that mentions the reason of donating our shekalim in Adar is to counteract the shekalim given by Haman.
Therefore Nitei Gavriel (Purim 8:1) quotes from Darkei Chaim Vesholom and Shefa Chaim that when Purim is on Sunday, the machatzis hashekel should be given twice, on Ta’anis Esther and on Purim day before megilla reading.
Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlt’a opinion is that one should follow the minhag of his family or community. However this year, it is better to give it on Thursday a weekday when money is available and you comply with the mitzva earlier.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/10/2017 12:18 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1272 These Coins Are Not For The “Coin-anim”
Q. Is it correct to write on the collection plate machatzis hashekel, or we should rather write “zecher” lemachatzis, so it would not become actually kadosh?

A.We find in Maseches Sofrim (21:3) that one shouldn't say he is giving the machatzis hashekel for atonement but only as a voluntary act. Darchei Moshe 694:1 quotes the above from the Chidushei Aguda. Following this, Chazon Ovadyah (Purim p. 101) writes that one shouldn't call it machatzis hashhekel but rather “zecher” lemachatzis hashekel, so that people won't think, one is actually making it hekdesh. Toras Hamoadim (p. 96), Zichronos Eliyahu (Shin; 2), and Shalmei Todah (Purim pg 270) agree. This is in opposition to Divrei Yosef (52) who says that it may become forbidden in benefit and even saying that it is Zecher Lemachatzis HaShekel is an issue. However, Zecher Simcha (76) and Kovetz Divrei Zeev (20: p. 10) rule that it is permitted to call it machatzis hashekel. Nitei Gavriel (Purim 8: 2) maintains that on the onset (lechatchila) it should be addressed as zecher lemachatzis hashekel. See also Shulchan Aruch (O.H. 469: 1) that prohibits saying; “this meat is for Pesach,” as it may be seen as consecrating a korban. However Mishna Berura (ibid.) maintains that it is permitted after the fact.
Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that there is no issue in calling the donation machatzis hashekel, as the vast majority of people do, since everyone knows that the donation purpose is for tzedaka and not to consecrate the coin for kodshim use. He pointed out to the Mishna (Nedarim 18b) that maintains people donate to items that they are familiar with. He added that today, since it is so common to write on anything including meats “Kosher Lepesach” (and not “Kosher al Pesach” as required by Shulchan Aruch (ibid.), there is no more point to avoid saying this meat is for Pesach and is similar to writing just machatzis hashekel.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/10/2017 12:12 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1271 The Answer To Your Prayers
Q. Would one be allowed to compose their own teffila, and if so can one say Hashem's name in it?

A. Midrash Tanchuma (Bereshis – Vayeshev 8) comments on the verse (39: 3) “And his master saw that the Hashem was with him,” how would the Egyptian master know? And explains that Yosef would constantly pray to Hashem and he overheard him. So it would seem from all the tefilos quoted in Tanach by the Patrirachs, Moshe Rabbenu, Eliahu, Chana,the Prophets et. al. And the tefilos of tzadikim throughout all generations are legendary.
Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is similar and one should always pray to Hashem when in need or to express thanks, even using His name with the honor due.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 3/6/2017 11:15 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1270 Missing In Action
Q. If one mistakenly began chazaras hashatz when there were only 9 people, realized his mistake in the middle of the 1st bracha (or any other bracha), and waited for the 10th person to return, does he now need to revert to the beginning of SE (since his earlier recital was invalid, as chazaras hashatz requires a minyan), or just continue from wherever he is now?

A. Shulchan Aruch (55: 2,3) rules that if the repetition of the amida began in the presence of a minyan and then some left, once they began with a minyan they may continue and finish this particular part of the tefila, including reciting the kadish shalem at the end. Mishna Berura (ibid.) explains, that this is true to other sections of the tefila too.
Therefore, Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that since the repetition of the amida, which constitutes an “inyan acher” or separate part of the tefila, began without a minyan, it has to be repeated again from the beginning once the ten are present again.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 3/6/2017 2:32 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1269 What Makes Your Spirit Fly - El or Al?
Q. What is the correct pronunciation of the first two words of Kaddish?
yisgadEl viyiskadAYsh or yisgadAl viyiskadAsh?

A. Poskim disagree as to the correct pronunciation of the first two words of kaddish. Mishna Berura (56: 2) quoting P’ri Megodim asserts that one should pronounce the first two words of kaddish with a tzeirei under the daled since it is the Hebrew and not the Aramaic version of the posuk in Yechezkel (38: 23) “And I will reveal Myself in My greatness and in My holiness.” So too is the opinion of the HaGra quoting Rashi (Ma’ase Rav 54). Mateh Ephraim (Kadish 20), Pische Olam (56: 1), Aruch Hashulchan (56: 3), Orchos Chaim (ibid. :4) quoting Eishel Avrohom and others.
However, other Poskim maintain that the correct pronunciation is with a patach (Mekor Chaim, Ya’avetz in his sidur, Ba’al Hatania in his sidur, et. al.). The fact that most sidurim from olden times and those printed today spell the words with a patach, speaks volumes. (See Kuntres Ohr Yisroel 48 p. 156. The article also explains the historical aspects of the change from the ancient patach to tzeirei)). Patach pronunciation is also the most accepted tradition by Ashkenazic and Sepharadic communities.
Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion likewise is that the patach pronunciation is the more grammatically correct.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a



Posted 3/3/2017 4:49 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1268 Jarring Experience
Q. When I empty a glass pickle jar or the like, in order to store other food items in it, do I need to toivel the jar or is it considered as if a Jew created a new jar? Does it make a difference if I am using the jar for myself or I am giving it away with food items in it?
What if I want to send food in it (like mishloach manos) to someone else- is toiveling required at any point then (by me, or the recipient)?

A. Poskim disagree on reusing food jars (such as pickle, conserves jars or wine bottles) that are usually only used once and discarded once empty. Teshuvos Vehanhogos (1: 446) Tevilas Kelim (4: 13) and others rule stringently in reusing them a second time without tevila.
However, Igrois Moishe (Y.D. 2: 2 and 137) maintains that since the intention of the consumer is to acquire only the food and the jar is of no consequence to him, prior to his unusual decision to reuse it. Therefore, at that decision time it turns from a usually disposable throwaway into a new usable utensil. Since it is now in his possession it does not require tevila. Chelkas Yaakov (2: 57), Ohr Letzion, Shearim Metzuyanim Behalacha (37) quothing Maharil Diskin and others are also lenient.
Taking into account that food storage utensils that one does not usually eat directly from them, some Poskim maintain that they do not require tevila (Halichot Olam 7: 8. See Tzitz Eliezer 8: 26: 3), Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that on glass jars, (as opposed to metal), one can be lenient not to require tevila.
However, if the recipient of the gift, is known to be from the machmirim, one should inform him that the jar was not immersed.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 3/3/2017 12:50 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1267 Hay There
Q. Is there any problem with feeding a guinea pig, (store bought) hay on Pesach?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit’a opinion is that If it is grass hay, there should not be any problem even when bought on Pesach. Legumes hay, should better be acquired before the Yom Tov begins, shaken and inspected for the unlikely case that there is still some grains of cereals left.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 3/3/2017 12:10 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1266 Do You Read Me?
Q. A baal teshuva who B’H has made great progress in learning, especially in the realm of practical Halacha, but he does not read Hebrew or even know the aleph-beis so well. Which is preferable: that he should shteig (raise) in learning (Halacha, etc.) and invest his efforts in learning Torah, which he B’H has great geshmak (delight) from, or that he should put aside time that he could be learning and instead work and invest his efforts into learning to read Hebrew, a task that he does not particularly enjoy?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit”a opinion is that, although it is most important to know how to read Hebrew in order to comply with mitzvos such as the reciting of shema, amida and brochos and others, yet all those could in principle be accomplished, at least meanwhile, by using a transliterated text.
However, without the basic knowledge of the Halachos of Shabbos, kashrus, tefila etc. etc. these essential mitzvos cannot be observed and kept.
The Rov suggested to continue and increase the learning that he so enjoys and is so necessary and essential, yet he should dedicate daily, some time, even a short amount, to learn Hebrew. (As he transliterates his tefilos and brochos, he should read the translation too).

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 3/2/2017 5:12 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1265 Here We Go Again?
Q. Due to their strained relationship, a wife refrained from going to the Mikvah. After 5-6 years, the couple made peace and returned to happily being married. When the wife returns to the Mikvah and the couple resumes marital relations, must the couple observe a separation period of 4+7 days and should she reimmerse in the Mikvah, as they did after their wedding night, because of a ch'shash for Dam Chimud?


A. Shulchan Aruch (Y.D. 192: 5) rules that one who remarries his divorcee, should wait seven days after establishing the date of the wedding as the law of dam chimud (menstruation caused by desire)applies.
The separation of four and seven days applies only when marrying a besula (virgin), which is obviously not the case here.
Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit'a opinion is that one should be stringent in an extended separation case and apply the dam chimud separation, as one would do with a machzir gerushoso (remarrying one's divorcee) case.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a



Posted 3/1/2017 3:48 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1264 Better Late Than No Prayer
Dear Rabbi,
Q. What is the correct course of action if one woke up very late on Shabbos morning, but it was not because of an oness, but was because, for example, you stayed up too late? Say one wakes up much past the latest time for Tefillah, but it is still before Chatzos? Should you daven shacharis? A condensed shacharis? Is there an inyan to finish Amida before Chatzos at least?
Thank you.

A. Mishna Berura (89: 6) rules that one should daven shacharis after four hours until chatzos. However, he recommends that one should do so as a tefilas nedovo (voluntary prayer), since there are Poskim who maintain that if the reason for the lateness was not accidental, one should not daven anymore. The above does not apply on Shabbos, since tefilas nedovo is not recited then.
As far as reciting the brochos of shema after four hours, Mishna Berura (58: 26) rules that even if it was due to an oness or an unavoidable circumstance it is prohibited as the blessing may be in vain.
However, in Biur Halocho (ibid.) he quotes Mishkenos Yaakov that is lenient in case of oness.
So after the fourth hour if one has time until midday after the fourth hour, he may say all the pesuke dezimara with the corresponding complete brochos of baruch sheamar and yishtabach. However, if he should or not recite the name of Hashem on the brochos of shema, would depend on the above opinions. Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit’a indicated that the minhag seems to be to say with the name. One should say the complete shema.
If pressed with time, he should avoid the blessings of the shema and he may shorten the pesukei dezimra.
One should also aim to end the amida completely before chatzos. If that is not possible he may start even if he wont be able to finish before midday. (Yavia Omer O.H. 7: 34, Vayaan Dovid 1; 19, et. al.)
Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit'a opinion is similar. In regards to considering staying late a mezid or intentional. The Rov maintains that it is a peshia or a negligent case close to being mezid, but still permitted to daven as above.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a



Posted 2/28/2017 2:28 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1266 Seller Beware
Q. Can a salesman on a Judaica store sell tefillin to a woman, when from her questions it is apparent that she plans to wear those tefilin herself?

A. See above question on the prohibition for a woman to don tefillin in our days. Horav Shlomo Miller’s Shlit”a opinion is that although there may be no prohibition of lifnei iver or placing a stumbling block before the blind (Vayikra 19: 14), since tefillin could be obtained from many sources including on line. However, one should not be a mesayea lidvar avera or helper and supporter of an improper act. He therefore recommends that the salesman should explain the woman the prohibitions mentioned in the prior question and dissuade her from her erroneous intention. He should also refer her to a competent rabbinical authority.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a.


Posted 2/24/2017 12:52 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1265 Don't Don
Q. If a woman wants to wear tefillin, is there any reason to object?
Thank you.

A. The Talmud (Eiruvin 96a) mentions that Michal the daughter of King Shaul donned tefilin and the sages did not protest. Mishna Berura (301: 158) quotes Magen Avrohom’s (ibid. : 154) ruling that if a woman finds a pair of tefilin on Shabbos is prohibited to wear them in order to bring them in as a clothing article since she doesn’t normally don them. However, Mishna Berura adds, that there are Poskim that permit since in principle by Talmudic law women are not prohibited to wear tefillin.
Rema in Shulchan Aruch (O.H. 38: 3) rules that we do object and disapprove of women wearing tefillin. Mishna Berura (13) quotes the reason of guf naki (body cleanliness) essential for putting on tefillin.
Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a pointed out to the words of Piskei Teshuvos in both locations mentioned above. He quotes a number of Poskim that although in principle would allow women to wear tefillin, since today there are not donned constantly. However, he then vehemently and emphatically quoting contemporary Poskim, rules that nowadays it is totally prohibited, even for a woman perusha (separated from the worldly) and extremely righteous. The reason he explains is that it has become a major issue of Reform Judaism. Besides, he points out to the Targum Yonassan Ben Uziel on the prohibition (Devorim 22: 5) “A man's attire shall not be on a woman.” The Targum translates the above as applying to tefillin and tzitzis.
He also cites Kaf Hachaim (38: 8) on the Cabalistic severe restrictions and extreme care asserted by the Arizal on women wearing Tefillin.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 2/24/2017 12:47 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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# 1264 Trust-us Citr-us
Q. I once read an article where someone was saying there was a problem with orange juice (even with a hechsher) because of "scale bugs" on the peels. I am just wondering if this potential issue would cause a problem with me slicing lemons and putting the slices (with the peels) into my water. I don't know if lemons have a "scale bug" issue or not . But if they do, can I put them into my water or do I need to remove the peel before putting the lemon into the water.
Thanks so much!

A. There are scale insects in lemons. You can get a good idea of what they look like at www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wCGfZkv88A. However they may not necessarily present a problem in the U.S. and Canada. The following is an excerpt from an article published recently (5 Towns Jewish Times) by the title Are The Bugs in Tropicana Orange Juice Kosher? By Rabbi Yair Hoffman: “Why don’t the scale bugs come off in our hands after we peel an orange? In Israel, Rav Moshe Vaye, the leading halachic expert on bugs, writes that it is a serious problem and one may not peel an orange and then eat the fruit unless the scales have been removed or unless the one who peels it wears gloves while peeling and then removes them. It may be a little-known fact, but in the United States, this is not a problem with off-the-shelf oranges because the fruit is waxed and the scale bugs that remain after the intense high-pressure wash do not come off, on account of the wax.” The same should apply to shelf lemons.
Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit”a opinion is that if you are to place unpeeled slices of lemons into your tea or similar, you should on the onset wash them, scrub them well and inspect them before. however, after the fact they would be permitted.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit”a


Posted 2/17/2017 4:03 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)



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