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Have a question? Send it in! Questions are answered by Rabbi Bartfeld.

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#271 Making a Siyum on a Sefer from Nach
Q. Does one make a siyum on a sefer of nach?

A. Pnay Yehoshua (Brochos 17a) commenting on Rabbi Yochanan's custom after ending Sefer Iyov, mentions that you should celebrate a siyum at the conclusion of the learning of a complete sefer of Neviim or Kesuvim. So too is the opinion of Minchas Pitim (Y.D. 246,26) and Piskey Teshuvo (1, 194 in the notes) quoting the Avney Nezer’s tradition.

Haelef Lecha Shlomo (386) rules that you can perform a siyum even on a short Novi with few chapters, and it would be considered a seudas mitzvah as long as it was concluded by happenstance and not planed (as to eat meat in the nine days). A similar opinion is to be found in Igrois Moishe (O.H.1, 57 and O.H. 2,12) where he adds that the learning should be truthful and with some depth.

It is of interest that Mishne Halochos (1, 451) opines that finishing any of the great and accepted seforim of Musar, such as the Mesilas Yeshorim is reason for a siyum, other Poskimm disagree (Rivevos Ephraim O.H. 189).

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 4/16/2013 5:38 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (1)


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#270 Making a Siyum on Torah learning done through listening to a tape
Q. I listened to shiurim on all of sefer shmuel on tape. At the end, I listened to the magid shiur say a hadran, with no kaddish.

Does one make a siyum on learning done only by listening (in my van), with out an open sefer?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that you may perform a siyum on Torah learning done just by listening to a tape as it is considered learning. (Sefer Charedim 11 - Tziunum Latorah 9, - See; Biur Halocho 47,4 on the HaGro opinion on just thinking Torah thoughts).

Although it is a very important mitzvah to learn Torah while traveling, as we repeat twice daily "uvelechtecha baderech" (see Avos 3,4) care should be taken not to distract oneself from the necessary concentration needed for proper driving. Mogen Avrohom (110,10 from Talmud Taanis 10b) rules that one should abstain from the more engrossing Halocho learning if he is the conductor. (It is quoted from Rav Simcha Waserman Zt"l that he would not answer Halocho questions while driving).

Learning Nach however, would be acceptable.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a




Posted 4/16/2013 5:37 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#269 Allowing a housekeeper in your sold home on Pesach to eat and feed your cat Chometz
Q. We are going away for Pesach and will be selling all the chametz in the house. We have a housekeeper and a cat. She will be eating lunch from the chametz in the house and will be feeding the cat from the cat food in the house. Any problems?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a advised that you should sell the house, the chometz contents and the cat to the housekeeper. Besides the usual acquisitive acts of kinyan done on the house and the chometz contents, an aditional kinyan kesef and a kinyan hagvooh or lifting should be done on the cat. She would then be feeding her cat in her house with her own chometz.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/29/2013 2:26 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#268 Selling all the chametz in the house when you have a housekeeper
Q. We are going away for Pesach and will be selling all the chametz in the house. We have a housekeeper. We will be giving her no instructions for when she comes in Yom Tov. We presume she will be doing light housework. Any problems?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that you should still ask her not to do any melochos that are prohibited in Shabbos and Yom Tov.

Additionally, you have to be careful with the Kashrus and bishul akum issues involved.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/29/2013 2:21 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#267 Disposing Chometz when burning it is not allowed
Q. Is one obligated to search for chametz when in jail, if one won't be able to burn it, only flush it down?

A. Shulchan Oruch (O.H. 445,1) rules that although the accustomed practice is to burn the found chometz, it can be disposed off in any way. (see Mishna Berura ibid. 5). Someone imprisoned or hospitalized can flush the chometz down.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/29/2013 2:17 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#266 Bedikas Chometz without a Candle or Flashlight
Q. Can one search for chametz when in jail, if you can't use a candle or a flashlight?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that in those in exceptional occasions when no candle or flashlight is available or permitted, such as one imprisoned or hospitalized, bedikas chometz should be done using the existing light available.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/29/2013 2:13 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#265 Bedikas Chometz when in jail
Q. Do you have to do the search for chametz when in jail when your only personal area is your bunk and a shelf? There is going to be chametz anyway from the other inmate.

A. Poiskim rule that one hospitalized during Pesach should do bedikas chometz on his personal belongings on the eve of Pesach without a brocho. (Toras Hayoledes 43,1 – Bedikas Chometz Ubiuroy 3,51 – Piskey Teshuvos 437,1) since even if he is a paying patient he could be moved from room to room at the sole discretion of the hospital staff (ibid.).

Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that although a prison inmate has even less privileges than a hospital patient he still has to do a chometz search on what is available to him.

The fact that there is still chometz on the premises that belongs to the other inmate, does not exempt him from doing all he can to avoid possessing or eating his own chometz.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/29/2013 2:10 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#264 Buying eggs on Chol Hamoad
Q. Does one have to be makpid not to buy eggs on chol Hamoed because they may have been laid on yom tov?

A. There are a number of issues involved on buying eggs laid during Pesach if the chickens were fed chometz. (Igrois Moishe O.H. 3,61) therefore they should be bought before Pesach.

Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that at least on the beginning of Chol Hamoed you can be certain that due to the marketing and delivery conditions the available eggs where laid before Yom Tov.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as advised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/29/2013 2:05 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#263 Using English translations for Shnaim Mikro Veechod Targum.
Q. Rov Miller mentioned that there are mistakes in the English translation by some well known frum publishers - which translations would he recommend for this purpose? What about other ways of "reading" the parsha, e.g. by an English translation of Tzena U'Rene? When are such substitutes acceptable?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that there are many good translations that would serve the purpose well. It is difficult to recommend any one specifically, as it depends on the skills and tastes of the user. However if the reader feels that the text in incorrect in its translation, after double-checking he/she should contact the publishers.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/19/2013 4:47 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#262 Women's obligation to learn Torah
Q. Should high school girls be expected to cover the entire Chumash before they finish high school? Should any other limmud (study) take priority for women/girls?

A. Remoh (Y.D. 246,6) rules that women are obligated to learn and know the Halacha parts of the Torah on the mitzvos that apply to them, so they are able to comply with them correctly (and they are many, such as the laws of Brochos, Shabbos, Yom Tov, Kashrus, Taharas Hamishpacha etc.).

Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit'a opines that this knowledge takes priority.

However in order not to go astray from the ways of Hashem in today's promiscuous and unethical society they are also encouraged in learning the written Torah and Nach, Musar and s'forim on Emunah and ethics. (Chofetz Chaim in Likutey Halochos, Sota 21a - Oz Nid'bru 14,3,9 - Tzitz Eliezer 9,3,7 et al, see also Rambam, Talmud Torah 1,13 and Shulchan Aruch Y.D. ibid.).

They may also be exhorted in knowing Tanach as a necessary tool in helping the education and chinuch of their children.

Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlita opinion is that a well-equillibrated Jewish women education should include all the above.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/19/2013 4:43 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#261 Are women obligated in Shnaim Mikro Veechod Targum
Q. Last week (parshas Yisro) Rov Miller spoke at a Bar Mitzvah about the mitzvah of reading the weekly parasha with targum (translation). He mentioned that women should read the parsha using a reliable English translation if they do not understand the Hebrew text. I have a few questions about this: (1a) Is that understanding of what the Rov said accurately stated? (1b) I understood this means women should read the whole of every parsha - is that accurate? (2) What level of obligation or mitzvah is this for women?


A. Poiskim give two reasons for the obligation of completing the weekly parshios together with the congregation (Brochos 8a,b – O.H. 285:1) commonly known as reciting Shnaim Mikro Veechod Targum (twice the Hebrew chumash text and once the Aramaic translation). One is that it is an extension of the mitzvah of Torah learning and Torah knowledge. Therefore, they argue that since women are exempt from this particular mitzvah, they are also excepted from the mitzvah of completing the parshios. (Mishne Halochos 6, 60 – Likras Shabbos 5, 10 – Hashabbos Vehilchoseho p. 48). The second reason given is that it relates to the mitzvah of K'rias Hatorah or the weekly reading of the Torah by the congregation. Since according to Maseches Soifrim (18,4) quoted by Mogen Avrohom (ibid. 6) women are included in the mitzvah of K'rias Hatorah, which he compares to the reading of Hakhel, then it follows that women would also be incorporated in completing the weekly parsha. However in actual practice, Mishna Berura (ibid. 12) And Oruch Hashulchan (ibid.11) comment that women are not in the habit of attending the reading of the Torah on a regular Shabbos. As this constitutes the widespread practice today in most Kehilos, there is no reason to compel them in completing Shnaim Mikro Veechod Targum.

Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that women have no obligation, nor are they encouraged or dissuaded from completing the parshios and reciting Shnaim Mikro Vechod Targum, yet he recommends that they should read the Parsha on the original or as a translation. (Please see next question (#262) in regards to women learning Tanach)

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/19/2013 4:36 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#260 Talking or thinking about business on Shabbos and Yom Tov when it concerns doing mitzvos
Q. One should not be talking or even thinking about business on Shabbos and Yom Tov. For someone in, or going into Rabbonus, shouldn't they also avoid talking about who is running which cheder or the like, if their Kavanah is to potentially apply for a Parnasah there.

A. Shulchan Oruch (O.H. 306,6) rules that you are allowed to deal and talk about performing prohibited melochos and work during Shabbos when it concerns doing mitzvos. Obtaining a teaching position on a Cheider or Talmud Torah is a mitzvah and therefore permitted. (When not a mitzvah, only conversations are prohibited not thoughts)

Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit'a advises that no sums of monies for salaries or remuneration should be mentioned.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as advised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/15/2013 10:41 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#259 Minyan of Psukim and its accompanying gimatria in a name form at the end of each Parsha
Q. How come there is no count for the number of psukim at the end of pekudey as there is in every other parsha?

A. The count or minyan of psukim and its accompanying gimatria in a name form at the end of each parsha is attributed either to the early Baaley Hamassores (Toras Yaakov 87) or to the Sages of Tiberias (Masores Hatorah Vehaneviim).

Whether Parshas Pekudey is the exception in the count is debatable, as the Meiri in Kiryas Sefer and Sefer Hachilulim do quote the name Uziya which gimatrya equals 92.
Sefer Harokeach Bamidbar 7,3) elucidates the term of "Eglos Tzab" by revealing that the gimatrya of Tzab is 92, alluding to the number of days from the exit of Mitzraim until the making of the golden egel and that it is also the number of psukim in Pekudey.
Other texts quote different gimatryos. The Paris Tanach Manuscript mentiond “Yahalom” with an added Alef and the Malbim Tanach mentions "Etzei" (Alef Tzadik Alef, see periodical Sinai Vol 196).

Tapuchey Chaim (p. 173) in the name of the Admur of Gur gives a reason why we do not have any of these counts in today’s chumoshim.

He explains that actually in earlier editions the gimatrya siman or symbol was "B'li Kol Siman", "Bli Kol" adds 92. Mistakenly the publishers understood this literally as saying; No Siman, and they removed the existing ones.

The fact that this appears in Pekudey, could allude to the fact that this parsha is dedicated to the all important count and tally of the Mishkan's donations and work and no other count is necessary.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 3/11/2013 10:56 AM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#258 Contacting the police before buying a property
Q. I went to look at a house owned by a Yid who previously rented to someone who was growing drugs there and possibly running a chemical drug lab, as verified by a home inspector who told me to call the police and ask if there have been any drug raids on the house as it will affect the value/price that I should offer for the house. Is there any halacha preventing me from doing this?


A. Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that you are allowed to consult the police if there are any records on criminal actions or crimes committed in that property.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 2/22/2013 2:58 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (1)


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#257 Arranging a shidduch when the couple does not observe Taharas Hamishpacha.
Q. Is it permissible to arrange a shidduch if it is possible that the couple isn't religious enough to keep Taharas Hamishpacha?

A. Many Poskim maintain that there is no prohibition on arranging, helping or being mesader kidushin (performing the wedding ceremony) of a couple that does not observe taharas hamishpacha (family purity laws). Many require that the couple should commit to at least go once, prior to the marriage to the mikvah. (Minchas Yitzchok 1,10 – Chelkas Yaakov 1, 23 - Sridey Eish 2, 57 and 3, 28 – Hapardes year 13 vol. 5,7, 11 and year 23 vol.1 - Hilel Oimer Y.D. 67 - Hashavit Y.D. p.167).

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as advised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 2/19/2013 2:21 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#256 Deriving benefit from non-kosher animals
Q. I bought a pair of gloves and realized that they are made of pigskin with an acrylic lining.

Can I wear these even though I will be deriving pleasure from a pig? Is this the same as snake skin or alligator shoes or purses?

A. There is no prohibition on deriving benefit from non-kosher animals. It is also permitted to wear them during food preparation.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as advised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 2/19/2013 1:44 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#255 Studying the works of Rabbi Avraham Yitzchak HaKohen Kook zt"l
Q. I was told by someone that it is forbidden to study the works of Rabbi Avraham Yitzchak HaKohen Kook zt"l. Is this true or is it permitted? And if it is forbidden to study them in general, may one at least look up the quotes in these works attributed to him in the works of halachic decisors, such as Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt"l?

A. Although some of the opinions of Horav Avrohom Yitzchok HaKohen Kook Zt"l in regards to the interpretation of Geula and the status of the Land of Israel are seen as controversial to those maintained by mainstream Gedoilim of the last and today's generation, there is no disagreement as to the greatness of his Torah erudition and piety. He was backed by Horav Shmuel Salant ZT"l, (Ohr Shlomo p.7), endorsed by Horav I.Z. Meltzer Zt"l (Oz Nid'bru 4, p. 26) and his close relationship with Horav S.Z. Auerbach and his father Horav Chaim Yehuda Leib Zt"l is well known and amply described in Ohr Shlomo (p.10). As a Posek he is widely quoted in contemporary responsa, from Minchas Shlomo (4, p.162) and Tzitz Eliezer (7,48 – 8,31 – 10,41) to Nishmas Avrohom (4,14) et.al.

Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit'a opinion is that (Chas Vesholom) there is no prohibition on studying the works or quoting Horav Avrohom Yitzchok HaKohen Kook Zt"l.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 2/5/2013 11:42 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#254 Using the term Alav Hashalom in a situation where it probably may not be true
Q. I once heard from Rav Shlomo Miller shlit"a that one may not append the term a"h to the name of the deceased if the deceased was not observant, because a"h means that the Divine Presence hovers over the grave of such a person and it would not do so over a non-observant person.

What alternative abbreviation, if any, may be used, in English and in Hebrew, especially if one wishes to avoid unpleasant confrontation?

A. Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that if the deceased indeed qualifies as non-observant by conviction and belief and not only by accident such as a "tinok shenisba" (a "captured child" who was denied proper Torah education), the term "Tehey menuchoso b'shalom" which is more a plea and a blessing would be appropriate. The expression "alav hashalom" as you mention, is a statement connoting that Shechina hovers over him, which probably may not be true.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a.


Posted 2/5/2013 11:38 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#253 Understanding the 'removal of life support' and the 'Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order' contradiction
Q. I have heard that in Judaism (especially Orthodox), a power of attorney for health of a loved one is allowed to deny resuscitation to a sick person if they think they are not going to make it, however Jewish law does not allow them to unhook life support systems once they are in place, even if the person is functionally dead or there is little hope.

This makes zero sense to me -- the denial of resuscitation is like murder, as I have witnessed people revived and living many more years. I think the Jewish laws are backwards. I would feel much more guilty for "guessing" that a person has no chance and denying resuscitation, than I would pulling out life support on someone whose organs no longer function and who is functionally dead. Your comments would be appreciated. Many thanks! (By the way, not sure if Reform rabbis have a different slant on the Orthodox perspective.)

A. A fundamental mitzvah of the Torah is saving and preserving life. Anyone who is able to save another person’s life but fails to do so infringes the law of "You are not to stand (idly) by the blood of your fellow. (Lev.19:16).". Most of the commandments of the Torah such as Sabbath may therefore be overridden to extend the life even of a person who is dying and has no chance of living more than a short period.( Yuma 83a-85b). Although Halacha categorically emphasizes the preservation of life and prohibits Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders, there may be a few exceptions.

When someone is dying and is on the very final stage of life (namely a goses, who by definition will not usually survive more than 72 hours) but external causes, such as a loud noise or grains of salt on his tongue, impede his death, the noise may be silenced or the grains of salt carefully removed, although we know that after removing the impediment he will die within a shorter time. (Remo, Yoreh Deah, 339:1).
The Talmud (Avoda Zarah 17b) relates how Rabbi Chaninah Ben Teradyon was sentenced to be burned alive wrapped in a Torah scroll, while wet wool was placed on his chest to prolong the agonies of death. As he was slowly dying in terrible pain his disciples pleaded: "Open then thy mouth, that the fire may enter and the sooner put an end to thy sufferings," The Rabbi replied, "It is best that He who hath given the soul should also take it away: he (the Rabbi) should not hasten his own death." However Rabbi Chaninah did not impede the executioner from removing the wool and thus precipitating his death.

These are but two general examples on a complicated halacha.

Horav Shlomo Miller's Shlit"a opinion is that no DNR order should be given before the case is analyzed and reexamined by competent halachic authorities.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 2/5/2013 11:03 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)


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#252 Extending the life of an unconscious person.
Q. My mother was terminally ill, it was a matter of time according to the doctors. …
We were also told that every effort should be made to extend the life of a person, since even a short lapse of time is enough for a person to do teshuvah, does that apply to someone who is unconscious or suffers from dementia and is suffering?

A. Maintaining the life of a person is not necessarily a function of the individual's capacity or ability to do teshuva. Our Torah teaches us that life is a gift and it is not our prerogative to terminate it at will (Avos 4, 22), regardless of whether someone is unconscious or suffers from dementia.

Rabbi A. Bartfeld as revised by Horav Shlomo Miller Shlit"a


Posted 1/25/2013 2:06 PM | Tell a Friend | Ask The Rabbi | Comments (0)



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